This morning we are welcoming a new member to the family, Ms. Foxxy Cleopatra! Foxy is a Gray Fox who was found as an orphan several months ago. First attempts at contacting a wildlife rehabilitator proved unsuccessful, so the Fox was kept and raised as a family pet. Finally after several months, a rehabilitator was contacted. Unfortunately by that time she could not do anything with the habituated Fox; she had become far too friendly with humans to be released into the wild. To prevent euthanasia, we were asked to provide Foxxy sanctuary to which we quickly agreed! This sweet and loving girl is already situated in her new digs and has a long prosperous life ahead of her. Welcome to the Zoo beautiful!

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Look who's finally starting to feel better! You may remember this guy came in to us several weeks ago with a bacterial infection eating away at his mouth. As a result he lost several of his front teeth, and had gone weeks without eating.
Fortunatly vetting, strong injectable antibiotics, vitamins, medicated creams, and an improved diet have brought the infection under control! We still have a lot of work with this guy, but hope to have him in the habitat within the next few weeks. Special thanks to everyone for the donations, support, and volunteer hours; we couldn't save lives without you!

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Foxy Lady! 💓

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Have you met the newest members of our Giant Sulcata Family? One of our visitor favorites, there are now 7 Sulcatas you can find roaming throughout the Zoo.

Their diet consists largely of grass and other dry forage, but they also enjoy visitors bringing treats such as Carrots, Cucumbers, Zucchini, Squash, or Pumpkin (as do many of our other animals).

For the remainder of the warm months, the Sulcatas are taken outside the Zoo to graze on fresh grass every afternoon. Do you have a couple hours to spare in the afternoon? Volunteer to Tortoise sit at the Zoo! If interested in grazing the tortoises for 1 - 2 hours any afternoon, preferably on a weekly basis; please send us a Volunteer Form found at www.3palmszoo.org/information/volunteer-learn. It may be necessary to pickup an 85 lb tortoise to fulfill this responsibility.

Tortoise Trivia: What do you call a group of Tortoises? No Google Search!

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We are extremely grateful to BW Electric Inc for their service to our animals. Yesterday, this company was generous enough to donate their time and services to replace our meter socket. We were also humbled by the tremendous outpour of support from the local community. The animals are thankful to BW Electric and the community as a whole!

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We need your help! The Zoo is in dire need of an electrician to replace our meter socket. We already have the replacement socket, but we need an electrician to make the switch asap! Can you or anyone you know help? Any help would be greatly appreciated by us and the animals!

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Is anyone surprised by another rescue like this? This unfortunate fellow is not in good shape. He is suffering from several ailments, all a result of improper care, housing, and dietary needs. A severe Stomatitis infection is eating away at his mouth and causing his teeth to rot out. Stomatitis or mouth rot is a bacterial infection; a result of improper lighting, and dirty water. He is also thiamine deficient due to improper dietary needs. All too often alligators are fed cooked chicken by folks with little or no knowledge of the species. Cooked chicken does not have the proper vitamins, and is one of the worst things to feed a growing alligator. Even frozen thawed meats lack vitamins. Metabolic bone disease is also present, as is stunted growth. We see this in almost every illegal reptile we take in. There is no cure for this ailment and all we can do is prevent a worsening situation, and keep the animal comfortable.

Currently he has been prescribed injectable antibiotics, vitamin supplements, and medicated cream treatments. He has also eaten, and seems in good spirits despite the stress. We are hopeful for a good outcome, however this one will take a lot of time and hard work. How would you like to be the volunteer who gets to medicate those lips!

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Have you heard of the Nene? If you have been to Hawaii, there's no doubt you're familiar with this elusive bird. The Nene is considered the world's rarest goose, and one of the Earth's rarest birds. Found only on a few Hawaiian Islands, the Nene's population was once reduced to only 30 Birds! Conservation and captive breeding efforts have been somewhat successful; the Nene's now number about 2,800 Birds worldwide. Nene's are listed under the endangered species act, and receive full federal protection.

Last week we received a visit from a retired Avian fancier. He still had 7 birds in his collection and was hoping to have them placed together in an educational setting. Due to the rarity of the birds it was important they be in a public setting where folks may see and learn about the species. We were happy (and honored) to help, and welcomed 3 Hawaiian Nene's to the Zoo!

These birds are incredibly beautiful, and make the most amazing moans. You have to see them for yourself!

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How do you like your eggs?

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Meet Virginia! Virginia is an African Sulcata Tortoise; the fifth member of our herd. Four years ago, Virginia was found aimlessly wandering in New Castle County. A good hearted Samaritan rescued her and with the help of local authorities, began the search for her owner. Unfortunately the four year search proved fruitless. Time had come for Virginia to find a permanent home, and we were asked to help. You can now find Virginia within the safety and comforts of the Zoo. Welcome to the Zoo big girl!

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Hello again! Do you remember me? On Monday morning my story, along with my picture, was posted presenting an identification challenge. There were a lot of good guesses, and some of you got it right. If you knew me as a Chicken Turtle, you are correct! You can now find me settled in with my new tropical friends in the Rain Forest Habitat.

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Hi! My name is Squirt, and I'm new to the Zoo. I'm not from this neck of the woods. I was collected from the wilds of Florida seven years ago as a hatchling. I was once a common species, but people thought we tasted like chicken and nearly hunted us to extinction. Fortunately our numbers are now stable, however we still face threats to our habitats. Do you know what kind of turtle I am?

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